Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento

News and information about Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento located in Sacramento, CA.

Sutter’s Historic ‘Maternity’ Statue Finds New Home to Be Work of Art

Posted by on Dec 7, 2015 | 0 comments

SACRAMENTO — When all women’s services moved to the Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center on Aug. 8, there was “one member of the team missing,” said Aneen Heller, nurse director of the Maternal/Newborn unit at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento.

Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento CEO Carrie Owen Plietz, left, Chief Nurse Executive Sue Sherman and Maternal/Newborn Nurse Director Aneen Heller reveal the statue "Maternity" on the sixth floor.

Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento CEO Carrie Owen Plietz, left, Chief Nurse Executive Sue Sherman and Maternal/Newborn Nurse Director Aneen Heller reveal the statue “Maternity” on the sixth floor.

That team member was the Greco-Roman-style statue of a mother and two children that has presided over the births of 360,000 Sacramentans since first installed in the original Sutter Hospital 90 years ago. The statue needed to go through a state process to meet earthquake standards, so it took a few months before arriving in its new home. Now it has found a perfect spot, just off the sixth-floor elevators on the way to Labor & Delivery and High Risk Maternity.

“This is such a commemorative statue for our staff, for the community and for those who are coming to deliver here,” Aneen said during the statue’s unveiling ceremony held Monday, Dec. 7. Delivering mothers will “walk through here and see our statue, which we call ‘Maternity.’ … She’s an icon here with us, representing maternity and all that it stands for and what we serve for this community.”
Read More

Two Major Milestones Reached After Move to New Cardiac Center at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento

Posted by on Nov 20, 2015 | 0 comments

SACRAMENTO – Since moving into its new, entirely remodeled new home in August, the Sutter Heart & Vascular Institute at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento hit two 200th milestones and began a new approach to valve replacement that is safer for elderly patients.

Donald Valentine, left, had an implantable ventricular assist device for two years before receiving a heart transplant in 2011. Sutter Heart & Vascular Institute has implanted 200 of the devices since 2008.

Donald Valentine, left, had an implantable ventricular assist device for two years before receiving a heart transplant in 2011. Sutter Heart & Vascular Institute has implanted 200 of the devices since 2008.

Sutter Medical Center has now implanted more than 200 TAVRs – transcatheter aortic valve replacements – which replace a damaged aortic heart valve without open-heart surgery. Sutter heart surgeons and interventional cardiologists work together during the TAVR procedure in the new $7 million Hybrid Surgery Suite in the Ose Adams Medical Pavilion.

Since the move, SMCS became the first center in Sacramento to perform TAVR using conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, providing inherent benefits to these elderly and frail patients, most of whom are in their 80s and 90s. Only a handful of heart programs around the country have done TAVRs in this fashion.

In addition, Sutter’s heart failure program recently implanted its 200th ventricular assist device. The VAD program started eight years ago and has grown to become the largest such program in Northern California.
Read More

Halloween Scare Gives Paradise Man New Lease on Life with New Heart

Posted by on Nov 13, 2015 | 0 comments

SACRAMENTO – Larry Little was in bed on Halloween eve when he got a call: His new heart was ready.

“It was kind of scary,” said Little, 68, of Paradise, who was discharged from the hospital Friday, Nov. 13. “Truly it is. Whatever you think and know, you’re just not ready for that call. They say, ‘Come now.’ There it is, suddenly, in your face. Time to go. You surrender to the process.”

John Chin, M.D., center, medical director of the Sutter Heart Transplant Program, and Robert Kincade, M.D., the program's surgical director, talk about Larry Little's surgery and recovery from his heart transplant on Halloween.

John Chin, M.D., center, medical director of the Sutter Heart Transplant Program, and Robert Kincade, M.D., the program’s surgical director, talk about Larry Little’s surgery and recovery from his heart transplant on Halloween.

But what was a scary night turned into a Halloween treat, as Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento surgeons removed his weak heart and replaced it with a healthy one on Halloween morning, Oct. 31. Now, two weeks later, Little is healthy enough to go home.

Little’s surgery was the first heart transplant to be performed in Sutter’s new home for its cardiac services: the Ose Adams Medical Pavilion. The groundbreaking Sutter Heart & Vascular Institute began in the 1950s in Sutter Memorial Hospital, where many firsts in the Sacramento region were performed: the first open-heart surgery, the first pediatric heart surgery, the first heart valve replacement, etc. … and the first heart transplant in 1989. More than 150 heart transplants were performed since then at Sutter Memorial, which closed in August and all services transferred to the expanded and remodeled Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento campus in midtown.

Larry Little, center, and his Sutter care team give a thumbs' up on Friday, Nov. 13, when Little was discharged from the hospital and went home.

Larry Little, center, and his Sutter care team give a thumbs’ up on Friday, Nov. 13, when Little was discharged from the hospital and went home.

Since moving into its new home, the Sutter Heart & Vascular Institute hasn’t missed a beat. This week, it became the only Northern California hospital to be named by Truven as a 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospital for 2016, which awards those hospitals that are the highest performing in the nation.

Sutter Medical Center Named a Top Cardiac Hospital in Nation

Posted by on Nov 12, 2015 | 0 comments

SACRAMENTO — Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, which is the only heart transplant center in the region, was named one of the nation’s 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals for 2016 by Truven Health Analytics. Sutter Medical Center is the only hospital in Northern California to receive the award, which is based on an objective, quantitative study that identifies the nation’s best providers of cardiovascular care.

Basic RGBSelected from more than 1,000 U.S. hospitals, the Top 50 award winners provide outstanding care and set new standards in excellence for this high-profile service line, Truven says. The annual Truven study is based on publicly available data and a balanced look at patient outcomes, operational efficiencies and financial metrics. The 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals study is part of the esteemed 100 Top Hospitals program. Hospitals do not apply, and winners do not pay to market their honor. Sutter Medical Center has also been named a 100 Top Hospital for the past three years.

The 50 Top study provides key industry insights, including the fact that if all cardiovascular providers performed at the level of this year’s winners:
• Nearly 8,000 additional lives could be saved.
• Nearly 3,500 more heart patients could be complication-free.
• More than $1.3 billion could be saved.

That analysis was based only on Medicare patients; if the same standards were applied to all inpatients, the impact would be even greater, Truven said.

Specifically, the 2016 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals had:
Read More

Two Sutter Facilities Earn Top 15 Nods in Best Places Survey

Posted by on Oct 15, 2015 | 0 comments

Sutter Center for Psychiatry ranked 11th in the Small Provider Category in the Modern Healthcare Best Places to Work in Healthcare survey.

Sutter Center for Psychiatry ranked 11th in the Small Provider Category in the Modern Healthcare Best Places to Work in Healthcare survey.

SACRAMENTO – Sutter Davis Hospital and Sutter Center for Psychiatry each ranked in the top 15 of their respective categories when Modern Healthcare revealed its Best Places to Work rankings during the Best Places to Work Gala on Oct. 14 at the Omni Hotel in Nashville, Tenn.

Sutter Davis Hospital ranked 14th in the Medium Provider Category and 30th overall among all provider categories. Sutter Center for Psychiatry ranked 11th in the Small Provider Category and 32nd among all provider categories.

Jennifer Maher, CEO, SDH, and Don Hartman, Human Resources director, SDH, accepted awards for Sutter Davis Hospital. Jeffrey Symon, director of patient services, SMCS, and Kristin Lawson, HR manager, SMCS, accepted the award for Sutter Center for Psychiatry.

Sutter Davis Hospital was named as a Best Place to Work in Healthcare for the seventh year in a row and was the only hospital in California to make the list. Sutter Center for Psychiatry made the list for the fourth year and was the lone mental-health facility to make the list.

 

Sutter Memory Clinic Study Shows IVIG Could Be Key to Alzheimer’s Cure

Posted by on Oct 9, 2015 | 0 comments

SACRAMENTO – In a Sutter Institute of Medical Research study published this month in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, the blood product intravenous immunoglobulin, or IVIG, was found to reduce brain atrophy and cognitive decline in patients in the early, pre-dementia phase of Alzheimer’s disease.

Shawn Kile, M.D., is medical director of the groundbreaking Sutter Memory Clinic and was the principal investigator of the IVIG study.

Shawn Kile, M.D., is co-medical director of the groundbreaking Sutter Memory Clinic and was the principal investigator of the IVIG study.

IVIG, extracted from the plasma of more than 1,000 blood donors, contains antibodies to amyloid, an abnormal brain protein found in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Sutter Institute of Medical Research, in partnership with Sutter Neuroscience Institute and Sutter Neuroradiology, designed the study to investigate if a course of IVIG could have practical, disease-modifying effects on Alzheimer’s disease when administered during the pre-dementia phase. The study showed promising results during the first year after treatment in the form of reduced brain atrophy as well as reduced conversions to Alzheimer’s disease dementia at one year, compared with a placebo group.

“This research shows some evidence that IVIG could prevent brain atrophy and delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease in patients who are in the beginning stages,” said Shawn Kile, M.D., Sutter Neuroscience Institute neurologist, co-medical director of the groundbreaking Sutter Memory Clinic and principal investigator of the IVIG study. “My hope is that our study will lead to additional investigations of this treatment strategy so we can eventually conquer this devastating disease.” Read More